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Researchers Observe ‘Space Hurricane’ in Earth’s Ionosphere


Hurricanes in the Earth’s low atmosphere are well known; however, disturbances resembling hurricanes had never before been detected in the upper atmosphere. “Until now, it was uncertain that space plasma hurricanes even existed, so to prove this with such a striking observation is incredible,” said Professor Mike Lockwood, a space scientist in the Department of [...]

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4,600-Year-Old Egyptian Painting Depicts Extinct Species of Goose


University of Queensland’s Dr. Anthony Romilio has examined the ‘Meidum Geese,’ a painting from the Chapel of Itet at Meidum in Egypt. The Meidum Geese painting was found in 1871 in a tomb located near the Meidum Pyramid, which was built by the pharaoh Snefru (reign 2610-2590 BCE). The tomb belonged to the pharaoh’s son, [...]

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Indoors, outdoors, 6 feet apart? Transmission risk of airborne viruses can be quantified


The rush for scientific understanding of the novel coronavirus has focused on biological mechanisms: how people get infected, the response of the human body, and the fastest path to a vaccine. As an aerosol scientist, Tami Bond went a different route, convening a research team that would treat the virus like any other aerosol. This team set out to quantify the dynamics of how aerosols like viruses travel from one person to another, under different circumstances.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

A quantum internet is closer to reality, thanks to this switch


When quantum computers become more powerful and widespread, they will need a robust quantum internet to communicate. Engineers have addressed an issue barring the development of quantum networks that are big enough to reliably support more than a handful of users.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Scientists use forest color to gauge permafrost depth


Researchers have developed a remote sensing method of measuring the depth of permafrost by analyzing vegetation cover in boreal ecosystems.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

New research highlights impact of the digital divide


The coronavirus pandemic has drawn new attention to the digital divide, as the need for online schooling and working from home has disproportionately hurt those without computer equipment and skills. New research finds that people with basic Information Technology (IT) skills are more likely to be employed, even in jobs that aren't explicitly tied to those skills.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Unveiling the weaving fractal network of connecting neurons


High-resolution imaging and 3D computer modeling show that the dendrites of neurons weave through space in a way that balances their need to connect to other neurons with the costs of doing so. The discovery emerged as researchers sought to understand the fractal nature of neurons as part of a project to design fractal-shaped electrodes to connect with retinal neurons to address vision loss due to retinal diseases.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Gulf Oil Spill's long-lasting legacy for dolphins


Health impacts from a 2010 spill are found even in dolphins born years later.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Rating tornado warnings charts a path to improve forecasts


A new method to rate tornado warnings shows that nighttime tornadoes in the U.S. have a lower probability of detection and a higher false-alarm rate than other events. Summertime tornadoes, occurring in June, July or August, also are more likely to evade warning.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Ultrasonic cleaning of salad could reduce instances of food poisoning


A new study has shown that gentle streams of water carrying sound and microscopic air bubbles can clean bacteria from salad leaves more effectively than current washing methods used by suppliers and consumers. As well as reducing food poisoning, the findings could reduce food waste and have implications for the growing threat of anti-microbial resistance.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Intriguing particles emerge when two photons couple


Researchers exploring the interactions between light particles, photons and matter find that optical microresonators host quasiparticles made by two photons.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Unusual earthquakes highlight central Utah volcanoes


Earthquakes in the Black Rock Desert are rare and capturing the seismic recordings from these earthquakes provides a glimpse into the volcanic system of the Black Rock Desert that, while not showing any signs of erupting, is still active.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Placebo effect may explain reported benefits of psychedelic microdoses


Positive psychological effects associated with taking small doses of psychedelic drugs are likely the result of users' expectations, suggests a new study.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

A fluid solution to dendrite growth in lithium metal batteries


Lithium metal batteries have higher charge density than conventional lithium ion batteries but are prone to problems of tree-like metal dendrites, which can cause short circuits or explosions. A new article shows that flowing ions near the cathode can prevent this problem.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Heart disease is in the eye of the beholder


Researchers have identified a potential new marker that shows cardiovascular disease may be present in a patient using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) scan -- a non-invasive diagnostic tool commonly used in ophthalmology and optometry clinics to create images of the retina. The finding suggests it may be possible to detect heart disease during an eye examination.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Disruption of lung biological clock in premature babies may raise later flu risk


Disruptions in the circadian rhythms in lung cells may explain why adults who survived premature birth are often more at risk of severe influenza infections, suggests a new study.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

Study highlights pitfalls associated with 'cybervetting' job candidates


A recent study of how human resources professionals review online information and social media profiles of job candidates highlights the ways in which so-called 'cybervetting' can introduce bias and moral judgment into the hiring process.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

COVID-19 can kill heart muscle cells, interfere with contraction


A new study provides evidence that COVID-19 patients' heart damage is caused by the virus invading and replicating inside heart muscle cells, leading to cell death and interfering with heart muscle contraction. The researchers used stem cells to engineer heart tissue that models the human infection and could help in studying the disease and developing possible therapies.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

New Sauropod Dinosaur Discovered in Uzbekistan


Paleontologists have identified a new genus and species of rebbachisaurid dinosaur from a fossil uncovered in Uzbekistan. The newly-discovered dinosaur roamed Earth approximately 92 million years ago, during the Turonian stage of the Late Cretaceous epoch. Dubbed Dzharatitanis kingi, it belongs to Rebbachisauridae, a large family of plant-eating dinosaurs. A single isolated vertebra of the [...]

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How some animals sense the gritty texture of their food


There's more to taste than flavor. Let ice cream melt, and the next time you take it out of the freezer you'll find its texture icy instead of the smooth, creamy confection you're used to. Though its flavor hasn't changed, most people would agree the dessert is less appetizing.

Source: www.sciencedaily.com

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